If you're looking for a Hawaii online theft class, it's important to know your Hawaii theft laws. This can help you understand more about your offense.

Please note that the Hawaii theft and shoplifting laws shown on this page are to aid you in understanding your state Hawaii theft, shoplifting and stealing laws. While we have tried to show the latest version of Hawaii theft laws, we do not guarantee its accuracy. This page is not a replacement for legal advice from an attorney. We suggest that you consult with an appropriate lawyer for more information about Hawaii theft laws.

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Hawaii Theft Laws

708-830 Theft. A person commits theft if the person does any of the following:

(1) Obtains or exerts unauthorized control over property. A person obtains or exerts unauthorized control over the property of another with intent to deprive the other of the property.

(2) Property obtained or control exerted through deception. A person obtains, or exerts control over, the property of another by deception with intent to deprive the other of the property.

(3) Appropriation of property. A person obtains, or exerts control over, the property of another that the person knows to have been lost or mislaid or to have been delivered under a mistake as to the nature or amount of the property, the identity of the recipient, or other facts, and, with the intent to deprive the owner of the property, the person fails to take reasonable measures to discover and notify the owner.

(4) Obtaining services by deception. A person intentionally obtains services, known by the person to be available only for compensation, by deception, false token, or other means to avoid payment for the services. When compensation for services is ordinarily paid immediately upon the rendering of them, absconding without payment or offer to pay is prima facie evidence that the services were obtained by deception.

(5) Diversion of services. Having control over the disposition of services of another to which a person is not entitled, the person intentionally diverts those services to the person's own benefit or to the benefit of a person not entitled thereto.

(6) Failure to make required disposition of funds.

(a) A person intentionally obtains property from anyone upon an agreement, or subject to a known legal obligation, to make specified payment or other disposition, whether from the property or its proceeds or from the person's own property reserved in equivalent amount, and deals with the property as the person's own and fails to make the required payment or disposition. It does not matter that it is impossible to identify particular property as belonging to the victim at the time of the defendant's failure to make the required payment or disposition. A person's status as an officer or employee of the government or a financial institution is prima facie evidence that the person knows the person's legal obligations with respect to making payments and other dispositions. If the officer or employee fails to pay or account upon lawful demand, or if an audit reveals a falsification of accounts, it shall be prima facie evidence that the officer or employee has intentionally dealt with the property as the officer's or employee's own.

(b) A person obtains personal services from an employee upon agreement or subject to a known legal obligation to make a payment or other disposition of funds to a third person on account of the employment, and the person intentionally fails to make the payment or disposition at the proper time.

(7) Receiving stolen property. A person intentionally receives, retains, or disposes of the property of another, knowing that it has been stolen, with intent to deprive the owner of the property. It is prima facie evidence that a person knows the property to have been stolen if, being a dealer in property of the sort received, the person acquires the property for a consideration that the person knows is far below its reasonable value.

(8) Shoplifting.

(a) A person conceals or takes possession of the goods or merchandise of any store or retail establishment, with intent to defraud.

(b) A person alters the price tag or other price marking on goods or merchandise of any store or retail establishment, with intent to defraud.

(c) A person transfers the goods or merchandise of any store or retail establishment from one container to another, with intent to defraud.

The unaltered price or name tag or other marking on goods or merchandise, duly identified photographs or photocopies thereof, or printed register receipts shall be prima facie evidence of value and ownership of such goods or merchandise. Photographs of the goods or merchandise involved, duly identified in writing by the arresting police officer as accurately representing such goods or merchandise, shall be deemed competent evidence of the goods or merchandise involved and shall be admissible in any proceedings, hearings, and trials for shoplifting to the same extent as the goods or merchandise themselves.

§708-830.5 Theft in the first degree. (1) A person commits the offense of theft in the first degree if the person commits theft:

(a) Of property or services, the value of which exceeds $20,000;

(b) Of a firearm;

(c) Of dynamite or other explosive; or

(d) Of property or services during the time of a civil defense emergency proclaimed by the governor pursuant to chapter 128, within the area covered by the civil defense emergency or during the period of disaster relief under chapter 127, the value of which exceeds $300.

§708-831 Theft in the second degree. (1) A person commits the offense of theft in the second degree if the person commits theft:

(a) Of property from the person of another;

(b) Of property or services the value of which exceeds $300;

(c) Of an aquacultural product or part thereof from premises that is fenced or enclosed in a manner designed to exclude intruders or there is prominently displayed on the premises a sign or signs sufficient to give notice and reading as follows: "Private Property"; or

(d) Of agricultural equipment, supplies, or products, or part thereof, the value of which exceeds $100 but does not exceed $20,000, or of agricultural products that exceed twenty-five pounds, from premises that are fenced, enclosed, or secured in a manner designed to exclude intruders or there is prominently displayed on the premises a sign or signs sufficient to give notice and reading as follows: "Private Property". The sign or signs, containing letters not less than two inches in height, shall be placed along the boundary line of the land in a manner and in such position as to be clearly noticeable from outside the boundary line. Possession of agricultural products without ownership and movement certificates, when a certificate is required pursuant to chapter 145, is prima facie evidence that the products are or have been stolen.

(2) Theft in the second degree is a class C felony. A person convicted of committing the offense of theft in the second degree under [subsection (1)] (c) and (d) shall be sentenced in accordance with chapter 706, except that for the first offense, the court may impose a minimum sentence of a fine of at least $1,000 or two-fold damages sustained by the victim, whichever is greater.

§708-832 Theft in the third degree. (1) A person commits the offense of theft in the third degree if the person commits theft:

(a) Of property or services the value of which exceeds $100; or

(b) Of gasoline, diesel fuel, or other related petroleum products used as propellants of any value not exceeding $300.

§708-833 Theft in the fourth degree. (1) A person commits the offense of theft in the fourth degree if the person commits theft of property or services of any value not in excess of $100.

(2) Theft in the fourth degree is a petty misdemeanor.

§708-833.5 Shoplifting. A person convicted of committing the offense of shoplifting as defined in section 708-830 shall be sentenced as follows:

(1) In cases involving property the value or aggregate value of which exceeds $300: as a class C felony, provided that the minimum fine shall be four times the value or aggregate value involved;

(2) In cases involving property the value or aggregate value of which exceeds $100: as a misdemeanor, provided that the minimum fine shall be three times the value or aggregate value involved;

(3) In cases involving property the value or aggregate value of which is $100 or less: as a petty misdemeanor, provided that the minimum fine shall be twice the value or aggregate value involved;

(4) If a person has previously been convicted of committing the offense of shoplifting as defined in section 708-830, the minimum fine shall be doubled that specified in paragraphs (1), (2), and (3), respectively, as set forth above; provided in the event the convicted person defaults in payment of any fine, and the default was not contumacious, the court may sentence the person to community services as authorized by section 706-605(1)(e).

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